Musical Youth by Joanne C. Hillhouse

by Shivanee Ramlochan, Paper Based Blogger

Welcome to the 2015 Paper Based Advent Book Blog! Day Sixteen’s selection is a love story between young people that isn’t fixated on Romeo and Juliet-esque raging hormones, instead infusing a passion for melodies, lyrics and true connections between two teens deep in the first bloom of self-discovery: Joanne C. Hillhouse’s Musical Youth.

Second place winner of the inaugural CODE Burt Award for Caribbean Literature, this budding romance wins points for not layering its developments waist-deep in uncontrollable pheromones and cloying body spray. While not negating the effects of blossoming attraction, Musical Youth sets its conductor’s baton higher — focusing on true musicianship and motivation in the lives of its young protagonists: shy, self-conscious Zahara and street-smart yet similarly introspective Shaka.

The bonds that develop between this fledgling duo are also rooted in the traditional concerns of their Antiguan society. Stern grandmothers and admonishing grandfathers are present here, as are the persistent skin-colour biases which shape one troubling arm of our regional interactions. This novel’s strength proclaims itself in never shying away from the truth about our problems, while simultaneously celebrating the hard-won historical joys of our freedom — as citizens and music makers alike.

Zahara and Shaka’s affinity is chorded and constructed in the sweet rhythms of soca, of soul, rhythm & blues and Bob Marley’s reggae itself. Hillhouse writes some of her most luminous passages in describing the musical nature of the young virtuosos’ ardour:

“She thought he was magnificent, and it had nothing to do with his colour. It was his eyes that always seemed to have a smile in them and the way his features were arranged in a uniquely impish way so that he always seemed like he was pulling her leg. It was the way he moved his long, lean body, as if to the beat of an internal rhythm.”

Brimful with resonant notes on first-time courtships; adolescent discovery; tightly-knit friendships and the rewards of discipline, Musical Youth deserves multiple encores — this is one young adult pick you’ll want to savour several times over.

We recommend it for: teen readers seeking an antidote to Stephenie Meyer and the Twilight movement; fans of Laurie Halse Anderson’s powerful YA catalogue; adults who appreciate colourful, credible storytelling that lilts with sonic appreciation.

Caliebirri by Luis Blanco

by Shivanee Ramlochan, Paper Based Blogger

Origin stories — those tales that tell us the fascinating and legendary sources of our history — have long illuminated the world of children’s literature. There are scores of picture books devoted to the making of the world by a Creator’s hand, and it would not be inaccurate to add Caliebirri to the ranks of such imaginative folklore. However, what makes this simple, spellbinding narrative doubly effective is that it suits both young and adult palates. This enchanting, whimsical myth sheds light on a creation parable sacred to the Hivi/Guahibo peoples of Colombia and Venezuela. It is in Venezuela that this story is set — in the village of Cuideido (now called Santa Rita), in a time when “all the people were animals, because in the beginning, people were animals and the animals behaved like human beings.”

Using unornamented yet vivid text from Luis Blanco (translated by Bunty O’Connor), and incorporating black and white illustrations by Alfredo Almeida, Caliebirri is equal parts captivating and educational. It’s easy to see why Caribbean lifestyle blog, Designer Island Life, signalled this handbound gem as one of their 2013 Christmas List picks: they heralded it as nothing less than “a labour of love.”

Each book comes with a gorgeous, unique macaw feather-bookmark (painlessly donated by their avian owners!)

We at Paper Based agree: there’s something undeniably special about going on this adventure, about holding this string-bound marvel of a story in one’s hands while reading it aloud to wide-eyed toddlers, or savouring it privately. As you share in the wonder of discovering the remarkable, multiple-fruit bearing Caliebirri tree, alongside these intrepid forest creatures, you will be reminded of the power, and permanence, of so many ancestral fables. This is why we’re especially glad it’s our first book spotlight of 2014!

Three Picks from our Children’s Lit Treasure Chest!

by Shivanee Ramlochan, Paper Based Blogger

With the long vacation more than halfway done, little readers are already anticipating their return to classrooms, chalkboards and copybook assignments – some with pleasure, some with dread. Take heart: there are still a handful of weeks left to be filled with lazy, sunny days of reading! We’ve selected three titles to enchant junior bibliophiles, while simultaneously charming the adults who are narrating these adventures in words and pictures to their toddlers.

Birthday Suit by Olive Senior (Annick Press, 2012)

Birthday SuitJohnny, an energetic tyke, dislikes constraints of all types – particularly those including buttons, zippers and all fabric! His parents are hard-pressed to keep him dressed, and none of their defenses of attire seem to register with Johnny’s perpetually nude frolicks: so what happens when Johnny’s mom comes home one day with a pair of overalls designed to snap on… and stay snapped shut? Young Johnny violently reacts to being trapped in his confining new threads, and it’s up to his father to suggest the possible merits of being clad.

Olive Senior adds this exuberant, joyously-infused tale for wee clothing anti-enthusiasts to her impressive writing repertoire. Her colourful, effervescent prose meets a perfect complement, in Eugenie Fernandes’ vivid illustrations. Ideally suited to children between the ages of three to six, Birthday Suit can doubtless be enjoyed by young readers out of toddlerdom, as well as anyone who still secretly chafes at the thought of donning a business suit!

Kafiyah Meets the Moon (Mascot Books, 2012)

KafiyaMoonIntrepid young Kafiya dreams of a closer bond with her favourite figure of fascination in the night skies: she wants to talk to the moon. When her Grandma Etta divulges that the moon has a face just like Kafiya’s, the young girl is determined to see this for herself. She goes in search of this moon with a face, and is delighted when her late night conversations with the moon confirm all their similarities.

Janet Campbell’s debut book hearkens to the nascent fascination of so many children, portraying the moon as a friendly, compassionate being, Anais Lee’s illustrations render the dreamy, thoughtful exchanges between Kafiya and the moon with graceful lines and a series of gentle pastel tones. A sweetly affirmative invitation to engage with the world around us, Kafiya Meets the Moon makes for ideal before-bed reading: it’s the perfect precursor to a little girl’s nocturnal rambles with certain, captivating heavenly bodies.

The Miss Meow Pageant by Richardo Keens-Douglas (Annick Press, 1998)

MissMeowSparrow, Henrietta’s cat, might be considered one of the neighbourhood’s least attractive cats, but his owner doesn’t love him less, despite his apparent lack of comely appeal. Henrietta and her friend Len decide to enter Sparrow into the Miss Meow Pageant, a feline contest which boasts some coveted prizes. Training Sparrow up for the contest isn’t an easy road, but after a few trials, the calico is finally ready — will the Miss Meow judges favour him with the winning sash, or will Sparrow continue his reign as the least handsome kitty to ever saunter onto a pageant stage?

Keens-Douglas’ fifth title for young readers packs as much gaiety and superb storytelling mirth as his previous four offerings. His stalwart aficionados will be thrilled with the briskly paced plot, the several moments that give rise to peals of laughter, and the valiant progression of Sparrow himself, a most unlikely protagonist of many stripes and shades. Marie Lafrance’s drawings are boldly outlined, and possess an infectious off-kilter spirit that weds itself seamlessly to the uniqueness of this irrepressible slice of Keens-Douglas storytelling.

We particularly loved these three children’s literature gems, and we’re looking forward to delving into our substantial treasure trove of featured titles at Paper Based, to serve you up another merry assemblage soon!

Littletown Secrets by K. Jared Hosein

by Shivanee Ramlochan, Paper Based Blogger

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Published by Potbake Productions in 2013, K. Jared Hosein’s debut novella, Littletown Secrets, explores ideas of loneliness, peer pressure and persecution: decidedly adult themes, distilled through the perspective of young people who know what it means to be marginalized. These children take the stories of their dark, sometimes death-defying encounters to the only person who can be depended upon to keep these fantastical confessions safe: Littletown’s sole secret-keeper. The unnamed narrator listens to these terrifying and mettle-testing tales of revelation, and the more he learns, the more the reader learns about him: but will the reader ever unearth the private motivations that reside in the heart of the secret-keeper himself?

A pair of the author's illustrations depicting crucial moments in two of Littletown Secrets' stories.

A pair of the author’s illustrations depicting crucial moments in two of Littletown Secrets‘ stories.

In many ways, Littletown Secrets recommends itself as an unconventional, emotionally satisfying series of stories. It is sure to appeal to each young reader who enjoys tales that aren’t afraid to swerve off the beaten track. The collection benefits from a blend of magical realism, mild to moderate horror, and no small dose of levity, Adults and younger bibliophiles alike will find resonances with the work on multiple levels: older readers can glimpse shades and hues of the juvenile adventurers they once might have been; children can delight in reading well-rounded characters who perform starring roles in their stories – they rule the narratives, and aren’t subjected to the sideline silences they often endure in adult fiction.

An endearing, morally complex debut publication from a writer of young adult fiction worth monitoring, Littletown Secrets may well spark conversation concerning the natures of good and evil; the difficult process of growing up, and the liberating happiness of slaying one’s personal demons.

The Adventures of Manti and Andy by Gregory Thompson

by Shivanee Ramlochan, Paper Based Blogger

A Water Cycle Story, the first title in The Adventures of Manti and Andy

A Water Cycle Story, the first title in The Adventures of Manti and Andy

Andy, an inquisitive ant, meets Manti, a knowledgeable praying mantis, and the conversations between the two span educational topics in fun, informative ways, in this, Gregory Thompson’s series of environmentally-aware picture books for children. Vividly and colourfully illustrated by Rachael Frank, each primer investigates one major natural occurrence. In Book One, A Water Cycle Story, Manti explains the inner workings of the water cycle to Andy, showing him how each step that leads up to precipitation is important for the precious drops of water that fall from the sky.

In Book Three, A Food Chain Story, Andy’s nerve-wracking brush with danger in the silky clutches of a spider’s web prompts a chat with Manti on the unforgiving, fascinating nature of the structure of the food chain. Book Four, The Festival of Pollination, sees a reversal of roles, as Andy, usually the appreciative student, enlightens Manti on the importance of pollination. Andy emphasizes why it’s important for Manti not to greedily consume a busy honey bee in the midst of its important pollen transfer onto a passion fruit flower’s stigma. By the story’s end, both creatures have a renewed sense of admiration for the natural wonders of pollination’s crucial role in the plant life cycle.

Books Three and Four in the series, A Food Chain Story and The Festival of Pollination

Books Three and Four in the series, A Food Chain Story and The Festival of Pollination

The dialogue between this unlikely yet appealing duo is always wise and engaging, mixing scientific data with a storytelling style that’s exciting and readable. The books lend themselves wonderfully to being read aloud, each installation in the series deepening the friendship between Andy and Manti, while revealing useful, engaging facts about the environment and its inhabitants.

For more information on the series, visit Manti and Andy’s official website!

The Tale of the Forest Guardians by Ryan James

by Shivanee Ramlochan, Paper Based Blogger

Reading The Tale of the Forest Guardians, spending time in its conjured world of myth, where fantasy meets folklore, is the best way for an adult to indulge in a book geared towards younger readers. Written and illustrated by Ryan James, an SCAD-educated Trinidadian who has previously collaborated with prolific children’s literature author Andy Campbell, the book was also part of NALIS’s 2012 First Time Authors Appreciation Programme.

A revisionist tale steeped in tradition, while seeking to reconsider our folklores through fresh eyes, The Tale of the Forest Guardians explores the potential history of two mythical heavyweights: Mama D’Leau, and Papa Bois. The things we understand about these larger-than-life figures needn’t necessarily be set in stone, as stories like James’ remind us. In his tale, the pair are cast as Alston and Naida, two star-crossed, headstrong warrior-hunters from opposing clans, whose passion for each other melds into their fates: that of protecting and upholding the sanctity of Trinidad and Tobago’s forests.

James’ art buoys a narrative already fuelled by great heart: the illustrations seem at once drenched in ancient, tribal symbolism, while hinting to a style that is fresh, forward-minded and crisp. Characters and creatures fairly leap off the page in their desire to be known to the reader; villages and battles rise up in thickly-inked rolling mountains, crossed spears and claimed victories. We can but hope that The Tale of the Forest Guardians is only the first of several creative projects by this talented, ambitious young artist, who dares to not only imagine our mythical origins differently, but to present them to the world in stunning print.

Further information about James’ work can be found at his website and Facebook page.

Children’s Stories from The Bocas Lit Fest 2011

by Shivanee Ramlochan, Paper Based Blogger

Cover of Children’s Stories from The Bocas Lit Fest 2011

A tremendously important part of the NGC Bocas Lit Fest revolves around the ways in which the youngest readers are involved. Since the festival’s inception in 2011, one of the most popular and well-attended arms of the program is the KFC Children’s Storytelling series of events. In the run-up to the festival days, storytelling sessions are held at KFC restaurants across the country, including locations in Tobago, Couva, Chaguanas, San Fernando, Point Fortin, Mayaro and Arima. The festival days themselves boast a specific children’s programme that is crammed full of exciting activities, at which local storytellers and entertainers do their best to ensure that the young minds in attendance are endlessly delighted.

This book of sixteen tales is divided into two parts: the first features stories told by youngsters beneath the age of 10, and the second showcases the work of children aged 11 through 15. The titles of some stories are the same, but this is where the similarities stop. Each of the sixteeen fables is equally precious, highlighting the talent, creativity and boundless imagination of our nation’s budding wordsmiths. The entire collection is vividly illustrated by carnival and theatre designer, Clary Salandy. Salandy’s energetic, exuberant art helps bring the stories to life, as boisterous market scenes, animated sea creatures and erupting volcanoes emerge from the printed pages.

A particularly fine example of the flourishing successes that can accompany children’s book publishing in our region, this collection would make a splendid Christmas present for:

  • aspiring young writers, in an effort to ensure them that it’s never too early to have authorly ambitions;
  • young readers eager to hear interesting stories told by a body of their peers;
  • collectors of children’s reading material who wish to expand their Caribbean title range.